Fr. Seraphim Rose (1934 – 1982)

Fr. Seraphim (Rose) of Platina

Fr. Seraphim (Rose) of Platina

Fr. Seraphim was an inspiration for thousands of people. He gave some of the most inspiring sermons ever uttered in the English language. His constant counsel was: “Never excuse yourself. If you must, or think you must, give way to a weakness, then be certain to recognize it as a weakness and a sin. But see your own faults and condemn not your brother!”

During the latter portion of his life, Fr. Seraphim continually emphasized the need for spiritual attentiveness in preparation for struggles to come. He seemed to have an awareness, a foreknowledge of apocalyptic times ahead. His message was conveyed in a well-known phrase: “It is later than you think!”

In conversation he was the proverbial “man of few words”. He had no interest in idle chatter, seldom expressed a personal preference for anything, and disliked fakery of all kinds, often speaking of the “Disneyland mentality” of America which was making it impossible for people to seek and find the truth.

It should be noted, however, that his apostleship — to Russia or to any other nation into whose languages his works are translated — did not emerge until he finished his earthly sojourn: he died in September, 1982 at the age of 48, and the twentieth anniversary of his untimely death is solemnly observed these days all over the globe. And here on earth he lived in a tiny Orthodox monastic community in the mountains of North California, constantly immersed into the church service cycle, into research, writing, editing and publishing work, translating treasures of Christian heritage into English, responding to letters from readers and inquirers, attending to the daily needs like gardening, firewood, truck engine and printing equipment, and praying in silence.

The death of Fr. Seraphim produced a spiritual phenomenon untold of in our times. Lying in state in a crude wooden coffin in the humble monastery church, not only did the body remain soft and life-like in the summer heat, but so comforting was his face that one could not bear to cover it, in the traditional monastic way. Even children could hardly move away from the coffin, since the body brought such internal peace and suggested such love. Everyone was aware that, in our times, among us, a holy man had left in his body a phenomenon that challenges science and our hearts.

http://www.orthodoxphotos.com/Orthodox_Elders/Various/Fr._Seraphim_Rose/index.shtml

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2 Responses to “Fr. Seraphim Rose (1934 – 1982)”


  1. 1 site May 29, 2012 at 5:05 pm

    I had been wondering if you ever thought of changing the design of your blog? Its very well written; I really like what youve got to state. But maybe you can include a a bit more in the way of content so people could connect with it better. You have got an awful lot of text for only having one or two photos. Maybe you could space it out better?


  1. 1 Is Conversion to Orthodoxy Escapist? A Response to Pastor Steven Wedgeworth | Orthodox-Reformed Bridge Trackback on May 18, 2013 at 11:39 pm

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